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Why does my defrosted breastmilk taste sour?

Why does my defrosted breastmilk taste sour?

“I took my pumped breastmilk out of the freezer and smelled it – it’s gone sour! It smells bad, and I think it’s gone off. I have a lot of frozen milk, will the rest be all the same? What should I do with it?” This is a question we receive frequently, and that causes a lot of concern. Because in these cases, the smell of the breastmilk is really unpleasant. So today, we explain what causes this change in…

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What happens if you have to be away from your baby for a few days?

What happens if you have to be away from your baby for a few days?

There are several reasons why you may have to be away from your baby for a few days. These may be desired or undesired reasons, but if you are breastfeeding, you will probably have questions about what will happen with you, with the baby, and with breastfeeding. We get asked this topic often, so we have gathered the most frequently asked questions and answers in this article. How will my baby be doing when I’m gone? Knowing what will happen…

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Breastfed babies’ bowel movements (stools)

Breastfed babies’ bowel movements (stools)

Many parents are worried about the appearance, smell, texture, and quantity of their baby’s poop and pee. But babies’ bowel movements are also an excellent way to assess breastmilk intake in exclusively breastfed babies. The first stools are called meconium, the remains of amniotic fluid that your baby has swallowed while in your womb. Meconium is black and gluey to sticky and is passed during your baby’s first three days. On the first day, it is usual to have two…

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Can I eat chocolate while breastfeeding?

Can I eat chocolate while breastfeeding?

During the postpartum period, you might have a special craving for sweets and wonder: can I eat chocolate while breastfeeding? If you have just given birth, someone might have gifted you a box of chocolates or some other type of chocolate, or you feel a strong desire to eat them now, even if you have never had a sweet tooth before. Does it have any effect on the baby? You may have heard that chocolate contains something called theobromine, which…

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When is it easier to wean?

When is it easier to wean?

You will know when the time has come, and you are ready to start with the weaning process. But it is interesting to know that there are certain “opportunity windows”, which are the moments when it is easier to wean your baby from breastfeeding. These are the periods of time when the baby’s development can make the weaning process easier. Did you know them? Weaning is a process that can be complex and requires information and support. This is why…

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Infant sleep: does exclusive breastfeeding improve it or make it worse?

Infant sleep: does exclusive breastfeeding improve it or make it worse?

Infant sleep is one of the most worrying issues for families with a newborn or older baby. Certainly, the lack of knowledge of the physiology of infant sleep and its evolution as a developmental process makes families experience night awakenings as something out of the ordinary, in addition to the resulting fatigue that discontinuous sleep brings with it. To date, the relationship between breastfeeding and the development of infant sleep is not clear: it is, in fact, a very controversial…

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Neonatal and maternal care in the first hours and breastfeeding initiation

Neonatal and maternal care in the first hours and breastfeeding initiation

Neonatal and maternal care in the first hours after birth is important for the initiation of breastfeeding and establishing it properly. Here key points are skin-to-skin contact and the first latch within the first two hours of life. The main strategy to promote breastfeeding physiology is based on grouping and adapting postnatal care, favoring unrestricted skin-to-skin contact, avoiding early separation of the baby from the mother’s body, and facilitating an environment that favors the mother’s release of oxytocin, that is,…

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Tubular Breasts: What they are and how they can Affect Breastfeeding

Tubular Breasts: What they are and how they can Affect Breastfeeding

Tubular breasts are a structural malformation of the mammary gland that leads to an atypical mammary structure and can affect a woman’s ability to produce breastmilk. How to identify tubular breasts? Breasts that develop in this way can be identified with the naked eye due to their asymmetry and shape. They can develop in a conical shape, presenting clearly scarce breast tissue in the lower part of the breast, and areolas are exaggeratedly prominent or ringed. In addition, these breasts…

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What is an IBCLC?

What is an IBCLC?

It’s International IBCLC Day on Wednesday, 1st of March! There are currently 33,492 IBCLCs in 125 countries, according to the IBLCE, the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners. So today, we will explain what an IBCLC is and how to become one. We know this is not a universally known figure in healthcare and many people wonder what these letters mean. So we wanted to dedicate this article to answering your questions on what an IBCLC is and how to…

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Will I be able to breastfeed with these nipples?

Will I be able to breastfeed with these nipples?

Every mother-to-be wonders at some point during pregnancy whether her nipples will be suitable for breastfeeding her baby. Nipples come in all shapes and sizes; in general, all of them are ideal for breastfeeding. Babies do not extract breastmilk by squeezing the nipple; they must latch on and suck the nipple and a good portion of the areola simultaneously because this is the only way to get the milk out. What is the purpose of the nipple? Given all nipples…

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